Category Archives: Organic Gardening

Guest Post – “Grow Your Own”

Guest Post – “Grow Your Own”

Guest Post – “Grow Your Own”

I would like to introduce to you Lisa Reinhardt, who is a green smoothie enthusiast at Green-Smoothie-Recipes.net.  Lisa has a fantastic website dedicated to green smoothies, health, balance, family and more.  I wrote a post for her website -Why Green Smoothies Are GREAT For You! – please check it out. and now it is my turn to share a post she wrote for all you.  Enjoy!

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Grow Your Own

 

It is summer time.  Summer can be a time of travel, parties and fun outside.  It can also be a time to intentionally slow down, regroup, and open-up.  My life for one is ruled by the school year, the busy calendars my kids are developing and my obligations to work and life in general.  In my coaching practice with other parents, I always start in the same place.  I want to grow their awareness on what is working now for them in their lives and what support systems or people are in place.  Some people in the coaching industry call this “self-care”.  I have come to prefer to call it “self-renewal”.  

 

What does this have to do smoothies and summer?  Well, a lot actually.  As humans (whether or not we are parents) we all share some basic needs like food, water, shelter, clothes, and transportation.  But, we also have a need to belong.  We want to feel like we are part of a group.  We are social animals.  There is nothing like a little gardening to bring us together, to help us remember our place in this world and to expand our capacity for gratitude.

 

Several years ago, when I was studying to become a coach and thinking about these things, I decided that building and planting a garden would be a great benefit for me and my family. It would give our family something productive to do together.  And, in order to garden effectively, one needs to slow down and be willing to get dirty.  My garden started out as a experiment.  I was curious to see if it would work or evolve.  Over the years it has moved from my experiment, to a family project to a source of good food.

 

We have figured out both what grows well and what we like to eat and can use.  So now, my family can participate in the entire cycle of the plant: seed to smoothie.  How cool is that?

 

The reason I am writing on this topic is that it has just recently occurred to me that this little experiment of mine has truly become a big part of our family.  It serves some of our basic needs by providing us with nourishing food, but it also builds the community of our family by having us slow down and work together.  In this way, the work of the garden has grown into a familial “self-renewal” practice of its own.

 

Now, for practical purposes our little garden does not grow enough food to make our smoothies all year round, but it does give us green throughout our growing season.

 

I am grateful to have been able to create a garden that can nourish me and my family in more ways than one.  My children can appreciate where the vegetables come from, and we the parents can slow down and get our hands dirty.  

 

Then there is a the harvest.  A harvest is the result of time.  It is the result of planting the right seeds at the right time and meeting their needs with warmth, light, water and soil.  The harvest only comes when I am diligent in my care of the plants in protecting them from animals and weeds.  Even after all my efforts, I know that much of the process is beyond my control.  The harvest can feel like a miracle.  Sometimes, the harvest can feel like me or like us.

 

So slow down.  Plant a garden, even if it is as small as mine.  Take care of it and be humbled as you grow a little of your own food.  Allow yourself to become more connected to other people and to nature in the process.  Then when all goes well, you use your bounty for one of your creations, smile.   

 

I have found that a smoothie made with the spinach grown in my backyard is much tastier than nearly every other kind.  The truth is that drinking smoothies, slows our pace.  One cannot consume a smoothie too quickly.  I think growing a garden takes that pacing full circle.  Go grown your own.

 

Peace.

Lisa

 

Lisa Reinhardt is a certified parent coach at TheParentJourney.net and a green smoothie enthusiast at Green-Smoothie-Recipes.net.  She transforms families through a holistic approach.

 

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For more healthy living and organic gardening tips, quick recipes, what I’m eating and inspirational quotes, LOVE me on Facebook and Subscribe to my YouTube Channel. Lots of fun stuff!

May the GREENS be with You! and Be Inspired!
Kibby

Organic Gardening 101 – How To Start an Organic Garden

Organic Gardening 101 – How To Start an Organic Garden

How To Start Your Own Organic Garden

There is something so rewarding at starting an organic garden from scratch, putting in the labor and eating the harvest once it is ready.  We’ve been growing in our garden for many years and each year we learn something new to make life easier and the produce BETTER. Growing your own food couldn’t be easier and the health benefits are priceless.  You know what kind of seeds or plants are purchased, the supplements added to the soil and plant to make them strong and healthy so that in turn they provide you and your body with top notch vitamins, minerals and more to accelerate your health to new levels.  Not to mention that it will save you LOTS of $$$$. 

Organic gardening means you won’t be using synthetic fertilizers or pesticides, but that doesn’t mean your plants are left to fend for themselves. There are tips and techniques you can use to bolster plant health and ward off pests. Organic gardening also isn’t just about what you don’t do, it’s about trying to foster a more holistic, natural ecosystem.  Work WITH mother nature, not against her.   Just as we strengthen our immune system to ward off bacteria, viruses and any unwanted visitors in our internal ecosystem, we apply the same strategy to plants.  Strengthen the soil with nutrients and the immune system of the plants and you have a great preventative against invading pests and bugs.  Weak plants and poor soil are a breeding ground for attack from all kinds of pests, bugs and disease.  Sound familiar?

When Scott and I started our organic garden, we had a large plot and borrowed a tractor from a neighbor and tilled up the soil, added LOTS of horse manure and organic mushroom compost to amend the soil.  We planted with good success but it was a LOT of work to weed and maintain.  The following year, we built a fence around the garden due to the deer, rabbits, ground hogs and whatever critters in the area saw that we had put out a smorgasbord of delights for them (NOT SO!)  Then with all the weeding and labor, we decided the next year to build raised beds to plant in and reduce the need for weeding.  Raised beds have been a blessing and I would highly recommend you start there instead of just growing in the ground.  Too much work.  This is where “No dig gardening” is wonderful!!  It has been a labor of love in progress.

“No dig gardening” or a raised garden bed, consists of layering organic materials on top of the soil to create a nutrient rich environment for your plants, in this case, vegetables and herbs.   The garden literally composts the materials while feeding the plants.  A raised garden bed means that it doesn’t matter what sort of soil you currently have.   Simply layer materials over the top of your surface and start growing!  Learn more here and here.    I wished we knew about this method years ago, but we all live and learn.  :)  You can also take this information and apply it towards growing in pots or containers. 

1)Location and sizeStart small.  Don’t take on more than you can handle or hoe.  Find a spot that is sizable and has growth potential for the future – you can always expand later.  Choose a location that receives as much sun as possible throughout the day.  Whether you choose to plant in an area of your yard or in containers on your porch/balcony, go for a brightly lit place.

2)  Soil :  You’ll want to amend your soil by mixing in compost, leaf and grass clippings and manure. Manure should be composted, unless you aren’t going to harvest or plant anything for two months after application. Preferably, get your manure from local livestock that have been organically and humanely raised — and never use manure from animals that eat meat.   If using the no dig method, layer with card board, leaves, compost, manure, etc. and let it decompose naturally (a few weeks or months) and you’re ready to plant.   The cardboard kills the grass and you don’t have to dig, but it doesn’t disturb the ecosystem below the sod (worms, bacteria, etc.) that is highly beneficial to your overall  soil ecology for future planting and plant nutrient uptake.   We go to our local recycling area and get cardboard and newspaper (color free) for FREE. 
 
If using pots or containers, purchase a quality organic compost and organic soil and maybe some worms that will further enhance the nutrient breakdown. Again, the better nutrient dense the soil, the better the plant.
 
3)  CompostCompost includes any biodegradable material which can be broken down into a fine, dark humus.  Compost feeds plants, helps conserve water, cuts down on weeds, and keeps food and yard waste out of landfills (where it produces methane), instead turning garbage into “black gold.” Spread compost around plants, mix with potting soil, use to bolster struggling plants.   We have cut down our garbage waste TREMENDOUSLY by composting our kitchen scrapes, coffee grinds, etc.

1. To get started, measure out a space at least three feet square. Your compost heap can be a simple pile or contained within a custom pen or bin (some can be rotated, to improve results).

2. Add alternating layers of carbon (or brown) material — leaves and garden trimmings — and nitrogen (or green) material — such as kitchen scraps and manure, with a thin layer of soil in between.

3. Top off the pile with four to six inches of soil. Turn the pile as new layers are added and water to keep (barely) moist, in order to foster microbe action. You should get good compost in as little as two months (longer if it’s cold).

4. A properly maintained compost pile shouldn’t smell. But if it does add more dry carbon material (leaves, straw, or sawdust) and turn it more frequently.

5. Even if you live in a city, you can do some composting under your counter with a tidy worm kit, or partner with a community garden.  (source)

Tip:  You can add some urine to the compost to activate it and get it breaking down quicker and add nutrients. Again, recycle, re-use and reduce.  It might seem gross, but it is great for compost!  Just saying!

4) Choose the right plants Many things are best grown from seed.  When you also grow your own seedlings, it’s a lot cheaper than purchasing them; not to mention that satisfying, gratifying feeling that you raised them yourself.   Backtime the date you hope you’ll be frost free and start your vegetable seedlings about 6-8 weeks earlier. Of course, you will have to start them off under cover or indoors.  I start my seedlings off indoors in small trays (from the garden center) that I re-use each year.  Look for seed companies that carry heirloom varieties that are non-GMO.  I like to purchase from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds and have for years.  I have had great success with their seeds and I have enough seeds now to not have to buy any for a long time.  I just use what I need for the year planting and store the rest (in original packets) in a zip-lock baggie in the freezer.  I also like to share seeds with friends and anyone else looking for certain varieties that I may have – I have PLENTY.   

When starting seeds indoors, they will need a light, airy soil that will hold moisture to grow. The soil should not be too light and sandy so that it dries out quickly, but not too heavy so that it compacts and clogs up the air spaces.  Normal garden soil or compost is NOT suitable.  Here’s a great tutorial on how to start seeds indoors.

If you’re buying seedlings, look for plants raised without chemical fertilizers and pesticides. A great place to look is at your local farmers’ market, which may also have native plants and varieties well suited to your area. It’s better to buy stocky seedlings with few, if any blooms yet, and with roots that don’t look overcrowded.

5) Plant according to space recommendations:   When it comes time to put those little babies in the ground, here’s what to do:

  • Mark where you plan to put each of your plants. Use a trowel to make a hole large enough to take the root system.
  • Have the soil in the seedlings’ containers damp enough so that the soil clings to the roots of each plant as much as possible.
  • Gently prise or tip out each vegetable seedling from its container taking as much of the soil as you can with it into the garden bed.
  • Firm the soil around the plant in its new position, cover the area with mulch and water in gently. Initially leave a small gap between the mulch and seedlings so that rot does not set in when the plants are so young and tender.
  • It is best to transplant seedlings in the late afternoon or evening to give the plants time to settle before being subjected to midday sun.  (source)

6) Proper Watering:

The best time to water plants is usually in the morning. Why? Mornings tend to be cool and without strong winds, so the amount of water lost to evaporation is reduced. If you water in the evening plants stay damp over night, making them more likely to be damaged by fungal and bacterial diseases.

Ideally, you want to water the roots, not the greenery, which is easily damaged. A drip or soak system can work great, or just carefully water the bases of plants by hand.  (source)

7) WeedingYep.  It’s going to happen in any garden.   Pulling weeds by hand may sound like hard work — and it can be — but it also can be good exercise, and gets you outside in the fresh air.  We love to go out after dinner (once a week), while the sun has gone down, and spend an hour pulling weeds, talking to each other and the plants, playing with the cat (Daphne) and connecting with the earth.  It is so grounding and healing.   Great way to de-stress and let all your worries go.  Don’t be lazy and put toxic chemicals on the weeds.  Go out there and get your hands dirty pulling weeds and enjoy knowing that you are creating a better environment for the plants to absorb nutrients (not those pesky weeds) to benefit YOU.

8) Protect Plants Without Toxic Pesticides If your plants are being assaulted by pests, it may be a sign of other problems, so the first thing you should do is make sure they are getting enough light, nutrients and moisture.  Organic weapons include Bacillus thuringiensis, a naturally occurring bacteria that disrupts the digestion of caterpillars and other leaf-eaters. You can also use horticultural oils, insecticidal soaps and garlic and/or hot pepper sprays and food-grade diatomaceous earth. 

9)  Harvesting:  Now, here’s the FUN part!   Generally, the more you harvest, the more your plants will produce for you.  During peak harvest season, you’ll likely find that it’s best to check your garden every day.  When harvesting leafy greens pick sporadically from the entire crop, a little from each plant.   In general, it’s best to cut produce off with a sharp knife or scissors, versus ripping with your fingers, which can cause more damage to plant tissue.   If you get too much bounty, remember you can also freeze, can, dehydrate and give away to friends and neighbors.  There’s nothing like nibbling on fresh greens that you just plucked from the garden.  :)

Have fun harvesting and creating delicious, nutritious meals with your bounty knowing that it is feeding you and your family amazing nutrients. 

 

 

For more healthy living and organic gardening tips, quick recipes, what I’m eating and inspirational quotes, LOVE me on Facebook and Subscribe to my YouTube Channel. Lots of fun stuff!

May the GREENS be with You! and Be Inspired!
Kibby

Raw Vegan TORTILLA Soup Recipe

Raw Vegan TORTILLA Soup Recipe

Healthy Raw Tortilla Soup

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 This is one of my FAVORITE soups that I’ve been making for over two years.  Now THAT is a good soup to stay in my food repertoire for so long.  It is so incredibly easy to make and full of nutrition.  With tomatoes and peppers coming in from the garden in surplus, I decided to blend up this little beauty.  This soup is an adaptation from Choosing Raw.

Ingredients:

  • 2 or 3 tomatoes, coarsely chopped
  • 2 large red/orange/ yellow bell peppers (or mix them up), coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes, packed
  • 2 large stalks celery, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro, packed
  • 3/4 cups water
  •  1 TB. lime or lemon juice
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  •  1 TB. cumin
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. paprika
  • 2 or 3 cloves garlic (you can use less, I just LOVE it!)
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 avocado – to thicken

Blend all ingredients (minus the avocado – you’ll put that in last!) in a high speed blender – I use a Vitamixuntil smooth.  Add the avocado and blend again.  This soup can be served room temperature or let the blender run several minutes and serve piping hot.  The avocado is added last so that the soup doesn’t turn into a mousse.  Adjust seasoning and flavors to taste.  Pour into bowls and top with chopped veggies of choice.  Diced tomato, avocado, more chopped cilantro, onion, organic corn kernels and organic corn chips are just delightful!  This soup serves 2 to 4 people depending on appetite.  I will serve this with a side salad and have left overs for the next day.  Soup is great cold too!

Raw Vegan TORTILLA Soup Recipe
Recipe Type: Soup
Author: Kibby’s Blended Life
Prep time: 10 mins
Total time: 10 mins
Serves: 2 – 4
This is one of my FAVORITE soups that I’ve been making for over two years. Now THAT is a good soup to stay in my food repertoire for so long. It is so incredibly easy to make and full of nutrition. With tomatoes and peppers coming in from the garden in surplus, I decided to blend up this little beauty.
Ingredients
  • 2 or 3 tomatoes, coarsely chopped
  • 2 large red/orange/ yellow bell peppers (or mix them up), coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup sundried tomatoes, packed
  • 2 large stalks celery, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro, packed
  • 3/4 cups water
  • 1 TB. lime or lemon juice
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • 1 TB. cumin
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp. paprika
  • 2 or 3 cloves garlic (you can use less, I just LOVE it!)
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 avocado – to thicken
Instructions
  1. Blend all ingredients (minus the avocado – you’ll put that in last!) in a high speed blender – I use a Vitamix – until smooth.
  2. Add the avocado and blend again.
  3. This soup can be served room temperature or let the blender run several minutes and serve piping hot.
  4. The avocado is added last so that the soup doesn’t turn into a mousse.
  5. Adjust seasoning and flavors to taste.
  6. Pour into bowls and top with chopped veggies of choice: Diced tomato, avocado, more chopped cilantro, onion, organic corn kernels and organic corn chips are just delightful!
Notes

This soup serves 2 to 4 people depending on appetite.
I will serve this with a side salad and have left overs for the next day. Soup is great cold too!

 
 
For more healthy living and organic gardening tips, quick recipes, what I’m eating and inspirational quotes, LOVE me on Facebook. Lots of fun stuff!

 

May the GREENS be with you! Kibby

Spicy Asian Cucumber Avocado Onion Salad

Spicy Asian Cucumber Avocado Onion Salad

 

Healthy Raw Spicy Cucumber Salad

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You are in for a treat today!  This salad is AMAZING and one of my favorites!  The zucchini’s have slowed down in the garden, however, the cucumbers have taken off and are coming in QUICKLY.  They too can double in size overnight and are quite abundant!  This recipe is perfect for using up one or two depending on size.  I’ve also been juicing the cucumbers with kale, lemon, ginger and an apple!   Delicious combination!  Cucumbers are SO GOOD for you.  Let’s look at some nutritional information on them first.

Health benefits of Cucumber

  • It is one of the very low calories vegetable; provides just 15 calories per 100 g. It contains no saturated fats or cholesterol. Cucumber peel is a good source of dietary fiber that helps reduce constipation, and offers some protection against colon cancers by eliminating toxic compounds from the gut.
  • It is a very good source of potassium, an important intracellular electrolyte. Potassium is a heart friendly electrolyte; helps reduce blood pressure and heart rates by countering effects of sodium.
  • It contains unique anti-oxidants in good ratios such as ß-carotene and α-carotene, vitamin-C, vitamin-A, zea-xanthin and lutein. These compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a role in aging and various disease processes.
  • Cucumbers have mild diuretic property probably due to their high water and potassium content, which helps in checking weight gain and high blood pressure.
  • They are surprisingly have high amount of vitamin K, provides about 17 µg of this vitamin per 100 g. Vitamin-K has been found to have potential role in bone strength by promoting osteotrophic (bone mass building) activity. It also has established role in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease patients by limiting neuronal damage in their brain. (source)

I bought my cucumber seeds back in early spring from Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds Co.  They are called Japanese Long – sweet, mild, extra-long fruit that are very crisp and mild.  Easy to digest, firm flesh with few seeds and burpless.   PERFECT!  They are so easy to grow and are abundant.   (*Organic gardening tip:  Cucumbers are heavy feeders and thrive in rich soil full of organic matter.  They can be trellised if desired – we did this last year and it worked great! so we continue this mode of planting.  A bit of afternoon shade is helpful in very hot summer areas.  Supply abundant moisture and keep mature fruit picked.*)  That’s it!  Easy.

Now let’s get to that recipe!

Spicy Cucumber Avocado Onion Salad

  • 1 or 2 cucumbers (depending on size)
  • 1 Avocado
  • 1/2 small red onion
  • 2 TB. hemp seeds
  • pinch of cayenne
  • 1 -2 TB. of coconut aminos (can substitute Bragg’s Aminos or Tamari)
  • Optional items:  grape tomatoes, seaweed (dulse, hijiki, arame)

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Cut cucumber, avocado, and onion into bite sized pieces.  Put into a bowl.  Sprinkle hemp seeds and a dash of cayenne (to taste) on top of cucumber/avocado/onion mix.  Add coconut aminos to taste and gently mix well.  (*I highly recommend to let marinate in fridge for at least an hour so that all the flavors can meld.*)  That’s it!

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Can eat by itself or serve over some fresh, baby greens. Very hydrating, cooling and filling.  I could eat this salad every day and not tire of it.  It’s THAT good.

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I am serving this by itself for dinner first, accompanied by a spicy, thai coconut soup.  Yum!

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Let me know if you are interested in the soup recipe and I will post for you.
 
For more healthy living and organic gardening tips, quick recipes, what I’m eating and inspirational quotes, LOVE me on Facebook. Lots of fun stuff!

 

May the GREENS be with you!
Kibby

Thoughtful Thursday

Thoughtful Thursday

How Does My Garden Grow and What It Has Taught Me - Part 2

Here’s Part 1, if you haven’t read it already.

The whole experience in Part 1 got me to thinking.  My garden teaches me to GROW!   I had some personal issues going on with myself and they came to a head just as the storm came thru my garden.  Just go with me here – an analogy between the garden and myself. My own “inner garden”. 

We live in an ever-expanding, unlimited Universe. The possibilities available to us are far beyond what our human minds can imagine. The only thing that ever limits us is our thinking. We waste our thoughts thinking of limitations. Our thoughts are so precious. Every thought we think is creating our future. Every thought! Sometimes in life, situations happen to us that seemingly beat us down,  and stress us out. 

I believe there is a reason for everything – whether or not we know what it is at the time – nothing is coincidence.  I saw the “beating down” from the storm in my veggie garden as a breaking down of old thoughts, old patterns and old ideas in my inner garden.  If the “storm” hadn’t come thru to do what it had to, I would still have those thoughts and patterns in my head.  When you get beat down/ fall down, pick yourself back up, dust off your britches and start anew.   By falling down sometimes, it helps us to see things from a new/ different perspective that we wouldn’t have seen otherwise.

Many of us would go to the place of being a victim – “Look what happened to me!  Why did this happen to me?!  (Insert situation).  Instead,  ask yourself “What can I learn from this?  Are my thoughts creating this situation?   We must be willing to release the patterns in our lives that are creating conditions we say we do not want. We must be willing to change.  Create, rebuild and grow new thoughts/ ideas/ situations.   So, I re-evaluated my thoughts with my inner garden and saw some negative ideas/ thoughts that I was not aware of in myself.   My veggie garden taught me some great lessons – some things that I had to see about myself that had holes and flaws in them.  I was able to witness these emotions (non-judgementally) without ego and from a place of Love.  I was in the perfect place and time frame for this to happen for me to be aware and open to the change.  Many situations that people are in or situations that occur in our lives can be master teachers or lessons (job related, relationships, health, etc.).  Ask yourself “What can I learn from this situation and how can I grow from this?”  It comes from a place of Love and compassion – especially for ourselves.  We have to be willing to FORGIVE – others and ourselves.

When you start changing old habits/ thoughts/ ideas, you kick up a lot of dust and uncover built up debris.  Anything from sadness, guilt, resentment, anger, pain, etc.  Most of us don’t want to look at these negative things we have accumulated in our lifetime (from very early on in childhood until this very moment in your life), but it is a step that you have to take before the NEW can take hold.   It’s like me going out to my garden and trying to plant in an area that is full of weeds and hasn’t been prepared.   I will need to create  a new space, pull weeds, maybe dig out grass (tougher work), amend the soil, let it rest a bit to see if anything else comes up that I need to pull out or clear.  There’s quite a bit of work, but it needs to be done and is so worth it for the overall results.  At that point, I can start adding organic compost to soil to nourish and feed (positive thoughts) so that when I put in plants, it will have all the old stuff out of the way and ready to thrive in the NEW and fertilized soil.

An affirmation is a beginning point. It opens the way. You are saying to your subconscious mind: I am taking responsibility. I am aware that there is something I can do to change.

If you continue to say the affirmation, either you will be ready to let whatever it is go, and the affirmation will become true; or it will open a new avenue to you.

The soil you plant in is your subconscious mind.  The seed/ plant is the new affirmation.  You allow the water and sunshine of positive thoughts, self love and approval to radiate on it.  You weed the garden by pulling out the negative thoughts that pop up.  Then watch it grow, produce and become your desire manifested.



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I was basically trying to plant something in my life before clearing out the space.  My veggie garden showed me an opportunity to grow and I am so thankful for it.  I have cleared out the old, I reinforce it daily with the NEW and approach life with love, joy and where I am to be.  By doing this for myself, I show that I am deserving, loved and open to my highest good.  Awaken gratitude in your life day to day.

We can think positive thoughts. We can say, “Yes, I can do it!”  We can think thoughts that make us feel joyous. We can learn to think only about all the good in the world. We can lift our thoughts up. We can greet the day with a smile. We can let the world know that we’re happy to be alive. We can express gratitude at every turn. We can love our bodies. We can be our own best friend.

**For more information on this subject and topic, please check out the books by Louise Hay You Can Heal Your Life,  and The Power Is Within You.  In these books, Louise explains how our beliefs and ideas about ourselves are often the cause of our emotional problems and physical maladies and how, by using certain tools, we can change our thinking and our lives for the better.  Louise’s key message in this powerful work is: If we are willing to do the mental work, almost anything can be healed. Louise explains how limiting beliefs and ideas are often the cause of illness, and how you can change your thinking…and improve the quality of your life!**

 ♥ For more healthy living and organic gardening tips, quick recipes, what I’m eating and inspirational quotes, LOVE me on FacebookLots of fun stuff!

 

Be inspired,
 
Kibby

 

Organic Gardening – How Mine Is Growing and Tips! Part 1

Organic Gardening – How Mine Is Growing and Tips! Part 1

How Does My Garden Grow and What It Has Taught Me

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It’s a cool, overcast, rainy day today and my garden is loving it!   Let me give you a quick background story  as to how my organic garden is doing from a month ago.

I started all my seeds indoors (like I normally do) back in March.  They grew beautifully!  By the beginning of May, they were ready to go out into the real world and be on their own and grow into wonderful, adult plants.  Proud mama! :)  Scott and I spent a few hours getting them all settled in to their new raised beds.  All was good!   Then, about a week later, a freak storm rolled thru on a Saturday evening bringing torrential rain, HIGH winds, and hail that covered the ground like it had snowed.  Again, can I say FREAK storm!  Never seen anything like it!   The next morning, we went out to check the property/ house/ cars and garden.  Everything was fine –  no damage – except to our newly planted garden plants.   They looked like they had been eaten by worms (full of holes and tears from the hail).  It pained me for a moment.  I lost a few things, but the rest were still intact – just a bit rough looking.     I picked up some of the plants that fell over and stood them back up straight and nestled their roots back in firmly.  Had to sow some new seeds on a few things.  Fertilized all of them with some organic fish emulsion to stimulate root /plant growth.  I have gone out every few days to weed the garden and talk to the plants (yes, I talk to my plants – they are a life source and can feel energy – so I give them LOTS of positive reinforcement and LOVE when I am amongst them).  It’s been about a month now since storm rolled thru and here is how they are looking.  We’ll have some beautiful bounty from these plants – it will just be a little longer to harvest than normal.   All was not lost.
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There are 9 zucchini plants here – thriving and about to bloom (a few weeds, I know!)  We keep grass growing in walk areas around raised beds.

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These are beets (left side of picture) and radishes (right side).  Wait!  I think I see something!  ????

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Radishes are READY!  They are such an easy crop.  Plant seeds and they are ready within 21 days to harvest for eating!

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There are two different varieties of kale.  Growing strong!  In the back are only two swiss chard plants that made it!  But they did and will produce plenty of nutrient packed leaves for eating!

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Behind the kale and swiss chard are several different varieties of peppers (colored bells, jalapeno, cayenne, mini colored, etc.)  They are bigger and greener than they were just a few weeks ago.

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These are 2 cucumber plants (2 more on other side of trellis).  Looking good!

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In this bed, there is parsley, cilantro, chives, stevia (yes, I know!), cinnamon basil, lemon basil, lime basil, chocolate basil (I know, again!), and regular basil.  Yeah!

I also have some tomatoes (about 9),  watermelons, asparagus, 5 blueberry bushes and 1 raspberry bush growing (not pictured).

So, THAT’S how my organic garden is growing – slowly but SURELY!  Tune in tomorrow for Part 2 on Thoughtful Thursday – it’s GOOD!

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